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Whether you’re 16 or 60, buying a used car is an exciting experience. But it can also be a huge financial burden. Some industry reports estimate that the average price of a used car is close to $28000. The more you know, the better you feel when you drive out. For example, dealers must put a buyer’s Guide on each used car. If you buy a used car online, you can also get the buyer’s Guide. The guide will tell you whether a car has a warranty or whether it is sold “as is.”. You also need to get a vehicle history report to know the facts about independent inspection, payment method, and how to deal with problems after the used car trading is completed.

Do your homework

Before you start buying used cars from car dealers, do some homework. It might save you a lot of money. Consider what kind of car you need, how you will use it, and your budget. Don’t forget other fees, such as registration, insurance, gas and maintenance. Study models, options, maintenance records, safety tests and mileage.

Once you have one or more cars, ask the dealer in writing about the outdoor price before you visit. Use these quotes

Confirm whether the price, discount and rebate on the advertisement are actually implemented

Confirm that the vehicle is on site

Dealers may try to introduce spot surcharges and other charges at the last minute

Then, find out the dealer before you go. Contact your state and local consumer protection agencies to see if there are outstanding complaints about a particular dealer. You can also search the name of the company online with the words “fraud”, “comment” or “complaint” to learn about the reputation of the dealer.

Dealer sales and buyer Guide

Dealers must display a buyer’s Guide on every used car they sell. They also have to give it to the buyer after they sell it. This includes light goods vehicles and trucks, tour buses and program buses. The protestors were not owned, rented or used as rental cars, but were driven by dealer staff. The planned vehicles are low mileage, current model year vehicles that are leased for a short period of time or returned after leasing. Dealers don’t need to show the buyer’s Guide on motorcycles and most recreational vehicles.

Used car trading buyers guide tells you

The main mechanical and electrical system of the car, including some of the main problems you should pay attention to

Whether the car is sold “as is” or has a warranty

What percentage of the repair fee will the dealer pay during the warranty period

Write down all the promises

Ask an independent mechanic to check the car before buying it

Get vehicle history reports and visit ftc.gov/usedcars for information on how to get reports, how to check for safety recalls, and other topics

If the sale is in Spanish, a Spanish buyer’s guide is available

Contact information of dealers, including complaint contact information

Remember: verbal promises are hard to implement

Dealers in Maine and Wisconsin display their own versions of the buyer’s Guide.

Pay attention to add ons

Accessories are optional products and services offered by dealers, such as clearance insurance, VIN etching, rust prevention. In general, add ons can cost thousands of dollars, and are only mentioned at the end of a day that is already very difficult and time-consuming for dealers. At other times, dealers may try to include these and other add-on components in your transaction without discussing them with you or your knowledge or approval. So make sure you ask questions, get written answers, know what you’re going to pay and what you’re going to get.

Independent inspection before used car trading

Vehicle history report cannot replace independent vehicle inspection. Vehicle history reports may list accident and flood losses, but usually do not list mechanical problems. That’s why it’s always a good idea to pay an independent mechanic for a mechanical inspection of a used car. Mechanical inspection is a good idea even if the car has been “certified” and inspected by the dealer and is being sold under warranty or service contract. You have to pay for the inspection, but it can help you avoid paying for a car with a major problem.

Mechanical inspection is different from safety inspection. Safety inspection usually focuses on the factors that make the car unsafe.

If the dealer doesn’t let you take the car from the parking lot, maybe it’s because of insurance restrictions, you can find a mobile inspection service to check it for the dealer. If not, ask the dealer to take the car to the place of your choice for inspection. If one dealer does not allow independent inspection, consider going to another dealer.

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